Copyright · Photography

Copypants Chronicles: First Licensing Case

We’ve recently been reaching out to some of our users, and asking them to recount some of their experiences with Copypants. We’ll be starting a series of posts where users get to describe how they discovered Copypants, and the kinds of cool things we’ve done for them. Introducing Copypants Chronicles.

 

I’ve been a semi professional photographer for 7 years. My main focus is event, landscape, and architecture photography. I recently attended a photography workshop that covered photography and the internet, and how to promote your work online. At the end there was a question period, where one person asked about keeping your images safe from infringement online. They were having trouble preventing infringement after posting their photos online, even after taking all the usual steps. Another audience member stepped in before the speaker could answer and mentioned Copypants. They had been using it to protect their images for 2 months and were experiencing some positive results. I decided to check it out when I got home.

I synced some images from my Facebook account and waited for them to do their magic. There was a message telling me I could leave the page, and they’d send me an email when it was done. That seemed pretty convenient. So I went to finish some other work. Within an hour or so it was finished. Since I synced my Facebook and not my website, and I have the same images on both, they found a lot of matches from my own website, which meant it was working. I imagine if I added my site, they wouldn’t show me those matches.

After searching through my matches for about 10 minutes, I found a match from an image I took while on a trip to San Francisco last year. The website was using the image as a cover photo for a news article. I’ve had my work published for news agencies in the past, but I knew I had not licensed this photo for this article. So of course I wanted them to pay for it.

I hit the license action and received a pop-up asking how much I wanted to charge. They suggested $25, but I usually charge more. I put in $75 just to see if it would work. They then asked the date that I originally published the image, if I had previously licensed the image, and for how much. After that, I only had to check off a couple boxes and hit send.

I didn’t hear much for about a week, but in the meantime they found a few more of my images on websites that had not asked permission. I was curious to see what they could find with the rest of my portfolio, so I signed up for a Growth account. A couple days after subscribing, a user support agent reached out to me thanking me for signing up, and congratulated me on closing the licensing case I opened. I must have missed the notification, but a couple days earlier the site that I sent a licensing request to had paid the fee! $75USD! I was pretty happy to say the least, the app had just paid for itself. After sorting out some details with my bank information, the money was deposited directly into my bank account!

My experience with Copypants has been great! I’ve been recommending it to all of my friends and colleagues.

 

If you would like to share your Copypants experience, please contact nick@copypants.com with the subject line “Copypants Chronicles”. 

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3 thoughts on “Copypants Chronicles: First Licensing Case

  1. Why should thieves be charged a TINY license fee? I don’t license for under $900 for up to one year. 4x the amount if they remove my metadata and credit.

    Like

    1. Hi there Elle! License fees are set at the creator’s discretion. Our suggestions are based on the size of their image being used, the traffic that the infringing page receives, and the site’s Alexa ranking. This particular site did not rank very high, which is why the suggested fee may be considered low.

      Since then, creators have closed cases through Copypants for thousands of dollars!

      Like

      1. Does it cost any money to open a case or only after you collect?
        It’s not clear on your site.
        Also what if I want to collect but want the infringer to cease using the image?

        I don’t feel a thief should be rewarded with future use of a photo.

        Like

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